On track! Running an effective meeting is more than the agenda – Summit version

Here’s me adulting at #STC17.

I had a blast, mostly because the attendees to my spotlight talk were so smart and engaging. I talked about a pretty dry subject, meeting management, and how to make your meetings go better by collecting expectations and gathering feedback. Thanks everyone for being such a great crowd.

Here are my slides.

Yeah, we all know meetings are a necessary evil. Managing them better can build a stronger team that gets more done in less time.

#STC16 – From Fred Flintstone to George Jetson: Creating Tension in Training Increases Adoption

The objective of a good training program is adoption and excellent field execution. This presentation is about how to use a combination of traditional training deliverables and old school psychology to gain user buy-in and achieve a successful launch. We’ll talk about how my company uses cartoons and countdowns to ensure that users seek out training and have a stake in adoption and field execution excellence.  

Whether we create video, user assistance, classroom training, or documentation, what we really want is a group of folks who use the product to do an excellent job with little or no effort and make no mistakes. Creating good training is less about the deliverable and more about building the right relationship.

Here are the slides from my presentation for #STC16 about a project that went really well.

Many thanks to Rachel Houghton for catching a photo of me #adulting.

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#STC16 – The Lightning Talks – You stink at email: Why spend time writing something nobody wants to read?

This lightning talk will take a look at business email and our bad habits that ensure deletion.
And then we’ll talk about Christy.

Here’s some video and my slides for the lightning talk at #STC16. Many thanks to Rachel Houghton for capturing this and the other lightning talks on youTube.

You stink at email: Why spend time writing something nobody wants to read?

Leadership: the best in us, Sunday, May 15, 2016

Don’t let the fancy name fool you. The Leadership Program is free and open to all STC members, whether they are officially in community leadership or not. So whether you just signed up yesterday, or are an elected officer in several communities, the Leadership Program is for you. And it’s free.

Communication Rising

If you’re attending Summit 2016, the STC International Conference, you’ll once again have a chance to attend the Leadership Program. This Sunday-morning event is filled with informative presentations and discussions about what it means to lead an STC community, suggestions for tools and processes to build stronger leadership, and recognition of dedicated volunteers.

The Leadership program is NOT just for those who are currently chapter or SIG leaders, though — it is open and FREE to all Summit 2016 attendees who want to learn about what goes into leading a chapter or SIG, how to get involved, and how you can build your own leadership skills. You’ll get to network with friendly leaders from around the world, meet members of the STC staff and board of directors, and take away plenty of tips and insights.

Here are some articles from 2015 that tell you more about the Leadership Program:

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Event Review: Content Strategy to the Rescue!

My friend Greta Boller writes great event reviews. Check out this write up of Tuesday’s InfoDevDC meetup.

The Lone Technical Writer

InfoDevDC kicked-off their event season Tuesday night with Content Strategy to the Rescue!Opower hosted the event that featured a presentation by Theresa Rogers and an Oktoberfest-themed spread (a keg, brats, the whole shebang). It promised to outline how Opower built their knowledge management team and teach how to grow an effective, sustainable content strategy from the bottom up.

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My Journey into #TechComm by Viqui Dill

Greta Boller is doing a blog series about getting into technical writing. Here’s a blog post I wrote for her series.

The Lone Technical Writer

This week kick-starts the series exploring how Washington, D.C. area technical writers broke into the profession. Viqui Dill, the Technical Communications Leader at American Woodmark Corporation, guest blogs this week and outlines her journey for us.

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Calling All Female Editors and Technical Writers

Today I spent a few minutes chatting with the future of Technical Communications about my job, my life, and my loves.

Emily is a Ph. D. candidate looking for women in technical communication to participate in a short interview for her research.

The interview is short, engaging, and fun. Contact Emily at her blog to find out more.

The Bookshelf of Emily J.

As you know, I’ve been working on a Ph.D. in technical and professional communication.  I’ve finally hit dissertation phase, and I’m looking for participants.

Here’s the official call:

As part of my current research for my dissertation at Utah State University, I’m conducting a study about women’s work experiences in the field of technical and professional communication. If you consider yourself to be a female practitioner (editor, technical writer, content manager, information/communication designer, etc.) within the field and are interested in participating, please contact me at januarypetersen [at] yahoo [dot] com or leave a comment on this post.

I’m looking for participants within the United States, but if you live outside of the country and feel you have something to offer to my study and really want to participate, let’s talk.

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Participation will include two interviews, which shouldn’t take more than a few hours of your time. I will also…

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